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-   -   If flight goes but I'm not allowed to enter USA no refunds (https://www.thedibb.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=1175253)

paulfoel 25 Jun 20 09:58 AM

If flight goes but I'm not allowed to enter USA no refunds
 
I guess some flights will run anyway since certain people are exempt from Trumps rules.

BA told me yesterday that I can only get a refund if BA cancels the flight. If it goes but I'm not allowed on it, then there is no refund only vouchers.

Seems a bit off. Anyone know if this is correct or not?

I'd like to go but I'd rather not be holding a couple of £Ks worth of flight vouchers.

steve30 25 Jun 20 10:03 AM

Thats correct.

Your travel insurance may be an option, depending on what level of cover you have and when you purchased it.

In all likelihood though if noone can get on the aircraft they will cancel it. Especially if its Orlando (really only a leisure destination).

Shooby doo 25 Jun 20 10:27 AM

I could depend on where you are flying into? MCO not currently on the list of airports so in theory no flights, not sure legally either as BA's sole purpose is to get you there & back but you wouldn't get passed check-in because all Estas are suspended IYKWIM. I'm not saying they are lying but I've had to chase more than a few "retailers" for refunds, that have tried to fob me off
SD:d:

Tigger71 25 Jun 20 10:43 AM

I donít blame the airlines - as long as they are allowed to land, why wouldnít they try to avoid having to pay refunds this way? Shifts the problem to insurers instead.

Donaldfan 25 Jun 20 10:47 AM

I've booked BA flights and overnight airport Bloc hotel as a package - I'm interested in seeing what happens.

Peko 25 Jun 20 11:22 AM

Legally the position is just the same as in pre-Covid times, it is the responsibility of the passenger to have the right of entry to the destination country (whether by nationality, residency or visa / ESTA).

If a flight operates, the airline is not legally liable for cancellation due to this condition not being met, it is treated just like a decision not to travel. The fact that the borders have been closed to many foreign nationals, or that the FCO is advising against travel, doesnít change the legal position. Theoretically the airlines donít even need to offer vouchers, but most have taken the decision to do that.

OP - you donít mention when and where your flight is, but for as long as BA is offering vouchers, you are probably better to sit tight and wait to see if the flight cancels, unless you have watertight insurance that will pay out if you cancel now.

123 25 Jun 20 11:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peko (Post 14547000)
Legally the position is just the same as in pre-Covid times, it is the responsibility of the passenger to have the right of entry to the destination country (whether by nationality, residency or visa / ESTA).

If a flight operates, the airline is not legally liable for cancellation due to this condition not being met, it is treated just like a decision not to travel. The fact that the borders have been closed to many foreign nationals, or that the FCO is advising against travel, doesnít change the legal position. Theoretically the airlines donít even need to offer vouchers, but most have taken the decision to do that.

OP - you donít mention when and where your flight is, but for as long as BA is offering vouchers, you are probably better to sit tight and wait to see if the flight cancels, unless you have watertight insurance that will pay out if you cancel now.

It won't be long before the airlines work out that a flight with two pilots and three crew (to look after the pilots) flying completely empty is much cheaper than actually paying refunds.

paulfoel 25 Jun 20 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steve30 (Post 14546885)
Thats correct.

Your travel insurance may be an option, depending on what level of cover you have and when you purchased it.

In all likelihood though if noone can get on the aircraft they will cancel it. Especially if its Orlando (really only a leisure destination).

Luckily the insurance is in place before covid so that helps but theres excess I guess.

I guess some flights will run due to people do need to travel back and fore and are exempt.

paulfoel 25 Jun 20 11:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peko (Post 14547000)
Legally the position is just the same as in pre-Covid times, it is the responsibility of the passenger to have the right of entry to the destination country (whether by nationality, residency or visa / ESTA).

If a flight operates, the airline is not legally liable for cancellation due to this condition not being met, it is treated just like a decision not to travel. The fact that the borders have been closed to many foreign nationals, or that the FCO is advising against travel, doesnít change the legal position. Theoretically the airlines donít even need to offer vouchers, but most have taken the decision to do that.

OP - you donít mention when and where your flight is, but for as long as BA is offering vouchers, you are probably better to sit tight and wait to see if the flight cancels, unless you have watertight insurance that will pay out if you cancel now.

I suppose you're right. I dont want them to cancel though I do want to go.

They cancelled one flight and moved me to alternate one on same day.

I'd rather not pay the balance, find out the flight is going but I can't go, then find all I can do is get a voucher to be honest.

Insurance not even sure if they would pay out to be honest? Even if this was booked before it all happened. Might not be too happy I've accepted a flight change.

dcmax 25 Jun 20 11:50 AM

keep in mind the flight also comes back and carrying some exempt passengers to the US and a US to UK leg with more pax - cargo both ways may also be just enough cashflow for them to be happy - they also dont want to loose slots... (especially when you take into account the refunds as 123 points out above) - -you should still be covered by insurance though if the FCO is still in place


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